33 books directly related to stock market 📚

All 33 stock market books as recommended by authors and experts. Updated weekly.

The 12% Solution: Earn a 12% Average Annual Return on your Money

By David Alan Carter,

Book cover of The 12% Solution: Earn a 12% Average Annual Return on your Money

Why this book?

This monthly approach uses three-month momentum to select two funds from a pool of four stock funds and two bond funds. The stock indexes are the S&P 500, S&P MidCap 400, Russell 2000, and Nasdaq, i.e. US large caps, mid caps, small caps, and tech. It’s not a revolutionary idea but provides a good introduction to major asset class switching, which runs circles around pundit guessing games. If you do nothing but swear off gut-guessing in favor of price reaction, you’ll beat almost everybody—including the supposed pros.


Master the Markets

By Tom Williams,

Book cover of Master the Markets

Why this book?

In financial markets, knowing what the large trader is doing is vital. In his book, Tom Williams, who was a syndicated trader, taught us the main signs that allow us to identify the participation of the large traders on the chart, which allows us to make judicious analyses about where the price is most likely to go.


How Markets Work: Disequilibrium, Entrepreneurship and Discovery

By Israel M Kirzner,

Book cover of How Markets Work: Disequilibrium, Entrepreneurship and Discovery

Why this book?

At New York University, I attended the Austrian Colloquium every week. I learned more about economics listening to Dr. Kirzner talk for 5 minutes than I did in any 2-hour class. Austrian economics is about human action – not unlike what you’ll find in The Economic Way of Thinking. The US stock market today seems to be drifting further and further away from Kirzner’s definition of a market: “Disequilibrium prices generate direct disappointment of plans… Such disappointment can be expected to alert entrepreneurs to the true temper of the market” and result in price discovery. Market makers and short sellers disrupt this process by altering the appearance of supply and demand for the shares of companies. This reason alone should call into question the stock exchange as a “marketplace.”


100 to 1 in the Stock Market: A Distinguished Security Analyst Tells How to Make More of Your Investment Opportunities

By Thomas William Phelps,

Book cover of 100 to 1 in the Stock Market: A Distinguished Security Analyst Tells How to Make More of Your Investment Opportunities

Why this book?

The classic from 1972 is the book that inspired me to write 100 Baggers. Phelps studied all the stocks that returned at least 100 to 1 from 1932 to 1971. You’ll learn where to look for 100 to 1 stocks and what key traits to focus on. Phelps writes in a folksy and quotable manner as he expounds on his philosophy of buying right and holding on. He writes, “When I was a boy a carpenter working for my father made this sage observation: ‘A lot of shavings don’t make a good workman.’” Let Phelps show you the power of patient, long-term investing.


Wiped Out. How I Lost a Fortune in the Stock Market While the Averages Were Making New Highs

By Anonymous,

Book cover of Wiped Out. How I Lost a Fortune in the Stock Market While the Averages Were Making New Highs

Why this book?

This is one of my favorite books because rather than observing the follies of others, this author details his own. Reading it is like watching a tragedy when you already know the well-meaning protagonist is going to die.

The author chose to remain anonymous for obvious reasons: He thought he was a rare fool. But getting wiped out happens all the time, to many people. If you want to experience vicariously a dangerous thrill ride that you may or may not already have taken, this is your ticket. The book is out of print and hard to find.


The Economic Way of Thinking

By Paul Heyne, Peter Boettke, David Prychitko

Book cover of The Economic Way of Thinking

Why this book?

This was required reading in my MBA program at Golden Gate University. In fact, the economics teacher, Joe Fuhrig, inspired me to go on for my PhD in Economics at New York University. The book explains how economics isn’t just about mathematical models: it is about how people think and behave. Once you learn to think like an economist, you will find investing (and even grocery shopping!) a completely different experience.


A Random Walk Down Wall Street: The Time-Tested Strategy for Successful Investing

By Burton G. Malkiel,

Book cover of A Random Walk Down Wall Street: The Time-Tested Strategy for Successful Investing

Why this book?

This is the classic book that tells us we can’t beat the market, and explains why. That hasn’t stopped me from trying, of course (did I mention “human nature” up above?).  Even Malkiel hedged somewhat—look at Warren Buffett, look at a handful of other famed investors who’ve consistently beaten the market—describing himself as “a random walker with a crutch.” I.e., the market is largely efficient, just not entirely so.  


The Little Book of Common Sense Investing: The Only Way to Guarantee Your Fair Share of Stock Market Returns

By John C. Bogle,

Book cover of The Little Book of Common Sense Investing: The Only Way to Guarantee Your Fair Share of Stock Market Returns

Why this book?

You probably know that Jack Bogle is the father of the index fund industry and here’s an opportunity to hear why he thinks index funds are the best way to invest in the market. I agree completely and like Bogle, I love to provide evidence that the market is so hard to beat, only a fraction of the active fund and investment managers do it consistently. So why take the chance? Read this and hear it from the master.


The Great Crash 1929

By John Kenneth Galbraith,

Book cover of The Great Crash 1929

Why this book?

A classic by the late great liberal economist, this book tells the American story of the greed, naivety and duplicity that laid the foundation for the implosion of Wall Street in 1929. It provides salutary reading for all investors. As Galbraith makes clear, bubbles always burst but few investors including professionals can summon the independence of mind to step aside before it’s too late. The author brings a sardonic rationality to this account of what was an avoidable disaster.


Reminiscences of a Stock Operator

By Edwin Lefèvre,

Book cover of Reminiscences of a Stock Operator

Why this book?

This is the most famous book on trading, the story of Jesse Livermore. It shows how he watched the patterns on the ticker tape, developed his trading style, and became rich. It is the book that all traders read when they go through a period of uncertainty. It is an uplifting story.


The World's Simplest Stock Picking Strategy: How to make money investing in the companies in your life

By Edward W. Ryan,

Book cover of The World's Simplest Stock Picking Strategy: How to make money investing in the companies in your life

Why this book?

I liked this book enough to write a blurb for it, as follows: “Any plan that would have led investors to Amazon, Apple, and Google is fine by me—and this one would have. Edward Ryan has created a systematic framework for owning what you know, a tried-and-true tactic.” No less a luminary than Peter Lynch endorses the idea, and in this book you’ll learn five steps to systematize it: list your life activities, extract stock ideas from them, rank those stocks, invest, and manage the portfolio. The second step is the most interesting to me; it’s where you consider which products and services in your life are most likely to keep a stock moving higher.


The Power of Passive Investing: More Wealth with Less Work

By Richard A. Ferri,

Book cover of The Power of Passive Investing: More Wealth with Less Work

Why this book?

A book that espouses the same principles as John Bogle – namely that ‘low-cost, passively managed index funds and exchange traded funds (ETFs) will outperform the active management’ of speculators, brokers, and fund managers with their higher costs. And, as the sub-title says, these principles require less work. Passive investing also requires less anxiety and less expertise. What’s not to love?


Whatever Happened to Thrift? Why Americans Don't Save and What to Do about It

By Ronald T. Wilcox,

Book cover of Whatever Happened to Thrift? Why Americans Don't Save and What to Do about It

Why this book?

We all know we should save – and yet we don’t. Even the people living in the world’s richest nation – the USA – don’t save enough. Why? Plenty of research, plenty of anecdotes, and then some solid insights and recommendations by Ronal Wilcox make this book useful for individuals, employees, employers, and policymakers.  


How to Make Money in Stocks: A Winning System in Good Times and Bad

By William O'Neil,

Book cover of How to Make Money in Stocks: A Winning System in Good Times and Bad

Why this book?

This is the book that started it all for me. O’Neil not only lays down what fundamentals to look for in growth stocks, he also shows readers when to buy and when to sell. The first 100 pages show charts with buy points in some of the biggest winners of all time. This is a book to be studied and studied over and over again.


Japanese Candlestick Charting Techniques

By Steve Nison,

Book cover of Japanese Candlestick Charting Techniques

Why this book?

A lot can happen in a day and it can often be difficult to summarize. However, in this book, Steve Nison shows how the ancient system of candlestick charting can be used to analyze trends and anticipate upcoming market moves. This book is required reading for anyone seeking to learn how to read charts.


Bulls, Bears and Other Beasts: A Story of the Indian Stock Market

By Santosh Nair,

Book cover of Bulls, Bears and Other Beasts: A Story of the Indian Stock Market

Why this book?

If you are interested in the history of the Indian stock market, then this book is a must-read for you. Written in an easy-to-understand language, the book will take you on an exciting journey from the early days of the Bombay Stock Exchange, narrating all major episodes and players with learnings that can help you to navigate in the Indian Stock Market.


Masterclass with Super-Investors

By Vishal Mittal, Saurabh Basrar,

Book cover of Masterclass with Super-Investors

Why this book?

This book is a collection of interviews with India’s successful money managers & investors having multi-decades experience. Ramesh Damani, Ramdeo Agarwal, Anil Goel, Vijay Kedia, Kenneth Andrade are well-known names in the Indian stock market. You will find their investment philosophy, mistakes, approach, etc. that will help on your investment journey.


Coffee Can Investing: The Low Risk Road to Stupendous Wealth

By Saurabh Mukherjea,

Book cover of Coffee Can Investing: The Low Risk Road to Stupendous Wealth

Why this book?

The book offers a low-risk, long-term investment approach by investing in high-quality stocks. There are lots of examples from the Indian stock market backed by data and charts supporting the method. Not for traders, the book will help serious long-term investors seeking wealth creation over the long run.


Replay

By Ken Grimwood,

Book cover of Replay

Why this book?

This book isn’t just my favorite time travel novel — it might be my favorite novel, period. Jeff Winston, in his forties and trapped in a miserable marriage, dies of a massive heart attack on page one. But don’t worry! By page four, Jeff has opened his eyes again, only to discover that he is in his own nineteen-year-old body, decades in the past, with the full memory of everything that will transpire in the interim. You think you know where this is headed, but you don’t — Grimwood’s tour de force contains a terrific twist on time travel that makes this a story about coming to terms with who you are and who you want to be.


Dual Momentum Investing: An Innovative Strategy for Higher Returns with Lower Risk

By Gary Antonacci,

Book cover of Dual Momentum Investing: An Innovative Strategy for Higher Returns with Lower Risk

Why this book?

I first encountered Gary Antonacci’s strategy in his paper “Risk Premia Harvesting Through Dual Momentum,” in which he called momentum “the premier market anomaly.” He found that combining absolute and relative momentum delivered optimal results. In this book, he shows how to boost performance with monthly switching among three asset classes in the following decision tree: Did the S&P 500 beat US bonds over the past 12 months? If no, own US bonds. If yes, did the S&P 500 beat global stocks over the past 12 months? If no, own global stocks. If yes, own the S&P 500. Just three funds could power this system: SPY (S&P 500), AGG (US bonds), VEU (global stocks ex US).


A Complete Guide To Volume Price Analysis

By Anna Coulling,

Book cover of A Complete Guide To Volume Price Analysis

Why this book?

To say this book is a bargain is an understatement, as it is only $4.99 in Kindle format. For me, it fills in what may be overlooked by those who have a passing knowledge of technical analysis and only focus on the look of the charts, and that is the importance of volume, you know, the little bar at the bottom!

Volume is such a powerful indicator but is easily disregarded in the excitement of a dramatic price move. Yet it is the confirmation that what you are seeing is not just an apparition and will lead to the expected outcome. All traders should read this!


Trading Price Action Trends: Technical Analysis of Price Charts Bar by Bar for the Serious Trader

By Al Brooks,

Book cover of Trading Price Action Trends: Technical Analysis of Price Charts Bar by Bar for the Serious Trader

Why this book?

Al Brooks is the most influential author on the pure study of price action. His trilogy is the bible for understanding the messages conveyed by individual candlesticks and price behavior as a whole.

The book teaches us how the market moves and provides clear ideas for taking advantage of different contexts: trends, ranges, and reversals.


Money Masters of Our Time

By John Train,

Book cover of Money Masters of Our Time

Why this book?

The book features the ideas of some of the most successful investors of all time, including Warren Buffett, Benjamin Graham, and John Bogle. What was it that made these investors so successful, and why are there so few of them?  Money Masters was one of the first in a series of books about the success of some of Wall Street’s greatest investors and it is still relevant today. These books are especially useful in preserving the thinking of great investors after they pass on. The book adds fuel to the fire of the “Efficient Market Theory” which holds that the market is highly efficient and the only way you can beat it is through luck! Try telling that to some of these great investors!


The Intelligent Investor

By Benjamin Graham,

Book cover of The Intelligent Investor

Why this book?

The most popular book by the father of value investing, The Intelligent Investor imparts Graham’s time-tested stock and bond selection principles in a manner that is less technical and more conversational than Graham and Dodd’s earlier Security AnalysisGraham’s core principles around conducting intrinsic value analysis first and then purchasing securities that the market has mispriced at below that value are all addressed here in wonderful Graham prose. Since he pioneered that strategy, it makes good sense to read directly from the master. 

Aside from that, what I like about this book is that it addresses the often overlooked but vital psychological aspects of investing. Last but not least, did I mention that The Intelligent Investor is Warren Buffett’s favorite investment book of all time? When I interviewed him for my own book, he stated that Graham’s book “just made clear sense to me as a book about investing, and I’ve been following it ever since.”


Poor Charlie's Almanack: The Wit and Wisdom of Charles T. Munger

By Charlie T. Munger,

Book cover of Poor Charlie's Almanack: The Wit and Wisdom of Charles T. Munger

Why this book?

The expanded third edition of this book was published in 2008. It contains the wisdom and wit arising from many years of the author’s investment experience. He and his partner Warren Buffett manage one of the largest investment operations in history.


The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable

By Nassim Nicholas Taleb,

Book cover of The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable

Why this book?

Taleb’s central idea is that it is impossible to predict the extreme impact of rare and unpredictable outlier events. His corollary is that we need to focus on building resiliency vs. better prediction capabilities. This notion of creating resilient organizations is central to our book but one which I see playing out over and over again as we experience wave after wave of disruptive, and seemingly improvable, events. 


Trade Like a Stock Market Wizard: How to Achieve Superperformance in Stocks in Any Market

By Mark Minervini,

Book cover of Trade Like a Stock Market Wizard: How to Achieve Superperformance in Stocks in Any Market

Why this book?

Mark Minervini is undoubtedly one of the greatest traders to ever live. This book is an absolute gem, building on what O’Neil wrote in his book. Minervini has gotten his trading down to absolute precision, from when to buy, when to sell, and how to screen for stocks. It’s all in here. A must-read for anyone looking to learn about trading.


Trade Your Way to Financial Freedom

By Van Tharp,

Book cover of Trade Your Way to Financial Freedom

Why this book?

Good trading does not always involve just buying and selling decisions. If it was, trading would be much easier! To be a successful trader, you must have your psychological “house” in order. And that is what this book is superb for. Trade Your Way To Financial Freedom assists you in navigating the turbulent mental, emotional and psychological waters all traders face.


How to Make Money With Breakout Trading: A Simple Stock Market Book for Beginners

By Indrazith Shantharaj,

Book cover of How to Make Money With Breakout Trading: A Simple Stock Market Book for Beginners

Why this book?

This is by far the simplest ever book written on a successful trading technique that can be implemented even by a novice trader. The author has shared his own experience, tested methods with real charts that make the book even more attractive. Anyone who aspires to become a successful trader will find the book beneficial.


Global Asset Allocation: A Survey of the World's Top Asset Allocation Strategies

By Mebane T. Faber,

Book cover of Global Asset Allocation: A Survey of the World's Top Asset Allocation Strategies

Why this book?

This book traverses the world to find asset allocation best practices, from master investors to lesser-known but equally helpful ones. The main takeaway is confirmation that basic asset classes are all you need, nothing exotic. All of the best systematic portfolios simply rearrange the basic asset classes in slightly different ways. The upshot for you? As long as you confine your portfolio management to these core building blocks, you probably won’t go wrong. It sure beats buying a penny stock everybody’s talking about.


You Can Be a Stock Market Genius: Uncover the Secret Hiding Places of Stock Market Profits

By Joel Greenblatt,

Book cover of You Can Be a Stock Market Genius: Uncover the Secret Hiding Places of Stock Market Profits

Why this book?

The book outlines an array of “special situations” that may offer very profitable opportunities, i.e. bankruptcies, restructurings, merger securities, and spinoffs, among others. Greenblatt underscores the importance of a set of basic ‘rules’ when delving into the universe of special situations: do your own work, don’t trust anyone, pick your spot and assess the downside, not the upside. The basic premise of the book is that it pays off to search for areas where there is a high probability of finding undervalued equities. You can make a lot of money sticking to the tried-and-true method of investing in and holding good companies for many years. However, if you are a more experienced investor looking for other areas to invest part of your portfolio in, this book will give you several new places to explore.


A Demon of Our Own Design: Markets, Hedge Funds, and the Perils of Financial Innovation

By Richard Bookstaber,

Book cover of A Demon of Our Own Design: Markets, Hedge Funds, and the Perils of Financial Innovation

Why this book?

I started working at Depository Trust Company in New York in September 1987 – a month later the “Black Monday” stock market crash happened! At the time, it was very difficult to see exactly what caused it. “When you are up to your neck in alligators, it is hard to remember why you drained the swamp!” This book explains how Wall Street banks hatched all those alligator eggs by hiring MIT math-whizz-kids and turning them loose without explaining the simplest thing about the stock market to them. One of the errors in their models was that they did not take bank holidays into account when calculating the time value of stocks and option prices.


The Elements of Investing: Easy Lessons for Every Investor

By Burton G. Malkiel, Charles D. Ellis,

Book cover of The Elements of Investing: Easy Lessons for Every Investor

Why this book?

This is a slim, to-the-point, easily understood book based on the same principles as the well-known book on writing, The Elements of Style. With its five chapters, it is the opposite of the highly complex, bewildering, we-know-more-than-you communication put out on a daily basis by the investment industry. Its wisdom is timeless. It’s all that a first-time investor needs to know.