11 books directly related to political correctness 📚

All 11 political correctness books as recommended by authors and experts. Updated weekly.

Book cover of Smokepit Fairytales (Volume 1)

Smokepit Fairytales (Volume 1)

By Tripp Ainsworth

Why this book?

Smokepit Fairytales is one of the most provocative, original and surreal works of military science fiction I’ve ever read. Written by US Marine veteran Tripp Ainsworth, Smokepit Fairytales is the first book in an epic series following the trials and tribulations of a small band of Marines. Each of the characters in this book are normal, flawed human beings trying to pass the boredom in between deployments with anything they can do to distract themselves. When a war unexpectedly breaks out, they must face down their fears and band together to get the job done and get home in once…
From the list:

The best military books written by veterans

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Book cover of The Rise of Victimhood Culture: Microaggressions, Safe Spaces, and the New Culture Wars

The Rise of Victimhood Culture: Microaggressions, Safe Spaces, and the New Culture Wars

By Bradley Campbell, Jason Manning

Why this book?

Campbell and Manning are sociologists who trace how a new moral culture of victimhood has given rise to political correctness. The new moral culture combines the properties of the old culture of honor and the old culture of dignity in a uniquely toxic way. The new victimhood culture borrows from honor culture its extreme sensitivity to insult, but borrows from the culture of dignity the tendency to call upon authorities and institutions to resolve disputes, rather than deal with them on a personal level. The victimhood culture is what has spawned the repressive campus environment of micro-aggressions, deplatforming, and bias…

From the list:

The best books on identity politics and political correctness in the university

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Book cover of The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics

The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics

By Mark Lilla

Why this book?

Lilla’s goal in this book is to show how identity politics threatens the electoral prospects of the Democratic Party. He argues that the party has thrown citizenship—the “we” in political conversation—out the window in favor of “personal identities in terms of the inner homunculus, a unique little thing composed of parts tinted by race, sex, and gender,” and that this will be electorally disastrous for the Democrats. But Lilla’s arguments show that it is disastrous for our national conversation as well. When we give personal identity weight in an argument (Lilla is superb at eviscerating the shopworn phrase “speaking as…

From the list:

The best books on identity politics and political correctness in the university

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Book cover of The Assault on American Excellence

The Assault on American Excellence

By Anthony T. Kronman

Why this book?

Kronman is particularly good at describing the “tough” reasoning skills that underlie the thinking styles that have produced modern science and modern democracies. An example of these tough skills is what he calls the “ethic of depersonalization”: expressing arguments in a form available to all—a form not dependent on our emotions or personal experience. Identity politics, in contrast, gives weight to immutable demographic characteristics in ongoing political conversations.  It thus reverses centuries of progress in the intellectual march toward open, ecumenical inquiry, where personal characteristics do not trump rational argument.

From the list:

The best books on identity politics and political correctness in the university

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Book cover of The Breakdown of Higher Education: How It Happened, the Damage It Does, and What Can Be Done

The Breakdown of Higher Education: How It Happened, the Damage It Does, and What Can Be Done

By John M. Ellis

Why this book?

Ellis chronicles the history of how the university turned from an institution of open inquiry into a political monoculture that requires those in it to adhere to a particular ideology. Ellis is particularly good at showing how the strengths of the traditional university were turned into weaknesses and allowed it to be captured by the adherents of identity politics. Old-style independent scholars are hard to organize, Ellis points out, because they are just that—independent. But these truly independent scholars were no match for the politically organized groups that wanted to use the university to advance a political agenda.

From the list:

The best books on identity politics and political correctness in the university

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Book cover of Identity Crisis

Identity Crisis

By Ben Elton

Why this book?

Identity Crisis is the most delicious satire! It is so much a send-up of modern times it will unfortunately date, and all too quickly become tomorrow’s history. But I don’t care. I will always find this one of the funniest books I have ever had the pleasure to read - indeed a wickedly witty laugh-out-loud on every page. Anyone who chooses to find the political incorrectness that abounds in Identity Crisis offensive really will need to delve deep in order to discover their obviously lost or sadly under-developed sense of humour.  

From the list:

The best books that embrace show business and history

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Book cover of The Pirates of Penzance

The Pirates of Penzance

By W.S. Gilbert, Arthur Sullivan

Why this book?

Before sitcoms, stand-up, SNL, and absolutely any great comedy movie you can name – there was Gilbert & Sullivan. Okay, yes they wrote operas (“light operas” technically; really more like our musicals today), but these works were created to be popular, scandalous, funny, and with hummable tunes for the masses. G&S operas were absurd, fantastic, politically incorrect, hysterical, “topsy turvy” extravaganzas that satirized (much like Wilde) the bourgeois mores of the day. Astonishingly, most of it holds up today, which is why you can still see Gilbert and Sullivan's productions being perpetually staged across the globe. If you can see…

From the list:

The best humor books from more than a century ago that remain funny today

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Book cover of Party Members

Party Members

By Arthur Meursault

Why this book?

Here we have the most politically incorrect of novels, an unflinchingly vicious take on China by a Westerner, though Party Members (pun on the second word) does have an acknowledged precursor in fellow Englishman Ralph Townsend’s Ways That Are Dark, an equally unsentimental account of China published in 1933. We follow the faceless bureaucrat protagonist, Yang Wei, as he inventively combines his passions for sex and KFC (China’s comfort food of choice) at one and the same time, and eggs on the state-sanctioned thugs who set his mother’s house on fire to clear it for developers – with her…

From the list:

The best novels written by foreigners in China

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Book cover of Bridget Jones's Diary

Bridget Jones's Diary

By Helen Fielding

Why this book?

In my humble opinion, Bridget Jones is one of the most iconic modern female fiction characters of all time. A single thirty-something woman, struggling to be taken seriously in her career. She’s out to show the world she’s capable of finding both success and love – and her barefaced accounts make for many laugh-out-loud moments.  

The reason Bridget is on my dinner guest list is simple: she’s super real. Yes, she’s from a different (and slightly less politically correct) time, but she’s not afraid to be herself, she understands and accepts her faults, and there’s not a drop of fakery…

From the list:

The best books with strong female leads who’d make great dinner guests

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Book cover of Barney's Version

Barney's Version

By Mordecai Richler

Why this book?

Everything you want to know about being Jewish, brilliant, vengeful, Jewish, neurotic, charming, and being a Canadian writer in Bohemian Paris in the fifties. Richler’s hero Barney Panofsky is the portrait of a man who wasted his life, but had a great time doing it. A self-proclaimed ‘impenitent rotter’, he is redeemed by his unwavering regret at losing the love of his third wife. Oh, the carousing, the romance, the revelry. How I wish I had been there.

From the list:

The best off-the-wall romance literature to surprise, delight, and challenge your perceptions

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Book cover of Incandescent: We Need to Talk about Light

Incandescent: We Need to Talk about Light

By Anna Levin

Why this book?

A warm, glowing book, like having a conversation with a sane, intelligent friend. I learned so much about light (and I thought I was an expert!): for example how modern LEDs produce light in a fundamentally different way from all previous human light sources. And I learned about politics too: how a fudge of obfuscated health risks, dodgy carbon-saving assumptions, and eco-virtue-signalling led to other bulbs being banned while light pollution soars. Levin, a wildlife journalist (her descriptions of the rhythm of light in the natural world are just beautiful) was motivated to explore all this because of her…

From the list:

The best books about conditions which people say don’t exist but do

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