The best books about mlik

2 authors have picked their favorite books about milk and why they recommend each book.

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The Giggler Treatment

By Roddy Doyle, Brian Ajhar (illustrator),

Book cover of The Giggler Treatment

This is a sentimental favourite. There is bathroom humour and funny furry “Gigglers” that protect children from mean adults. I read this book to my son on a plane from Dublin to Toronto after my mother died and he was hooked. I was hoarse after 4 hours but he wanted to finish it. It got very rude at the end (you have to read to find out) and I wanted to stop as we were close to other passengers and I was fading fast. I was talking him out of finishing when the passenger beside me piped up and said “you can’t stop now—what happens?" They added, “I never wanted children but seeing you with your son makes me think.” It’s a good read funny read and a moment I will always remember.

The Giggler Treatment

By Roddy Doyle, Brian Ajhar (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

2 authors picked The Giggler Treatment as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Gloriously silly comedy from Booker prize winner and bestseller Roddy
Doyle.

If adults are mean to children, they get the Giggler Treatment. It's
smelly. It's squishy. And it sticks to your shoe. But sometimes,
just sometimes, the Gigglers make a mistake...

Can Robbie, Kayla, Jimmy and Rover the dog come to Mr Mack's rescue
before the poo hits the shoe?

Look out for more cheeky runaway comedies starring the Mack family
and Rover the wonder-dog: ROVER SAVES CHRISTMAS (9781407139739)
and THE MEANWHILE ADVENTURES (9781407139746).

Who am I?

I really am passionate about children and education. Reading to children is such a joy especially when they snuggle in and get absorbed in the story. Education is the only way to achieve some sort of equity in our world. The world I knew as a child is no more and that is a good thing. Cruel biases and intolerance hurt so many. Today there is more freedom and the potential to live true to yourself whatever that may be. I like books that show the diversity of our humanity, that can be read to children to broaden their understanding, acceptance, and tolerance of family which may be very different from their own.


I wrote...

Basil's Unkie Herb

By Mary Shaw,

Book cover of Basil's Unkie Herb

What is my book about?

Basil’s Unkie Herb is a book about family, perception, and marriage equality. The book uses Basil’s birthday parties to detail how Unkie Herb’s birthday surprises usually have a funny or disastrous ending depending on your perception. The reader learns not to judge by appearances, Fred who owns a donkey and garbage truck is actually a veterinarian; the dangerous motorcycle riders turn out to be Basil’s teacher and Nana’s doctor. 

The book ends with Mom explaining to Basil that Unkie Herb and his boyfriend Ricardo can marry if they love each other because “where we live you can marry whomever you love.” This is a funny, laugh-out-loud book with a happy ending for everyone.

Yuck, a Love Story

By Don Gillmor, Marie-Louise Gay (illustrator),

Book cover of Yuck, a Love Story

When Amy moves in next to Austin, he is not impressed. He doesn’t need any girls in his life to mess up his perfect existence. He has a dog. He has a best friend. And he knows that a T-Rex will eat a girl with freckles. This book perfectly captures the strange world of very young love in the most innocent and hilarious way. The characters are solid, but they develop in such wonderful ways throughout the story. The art makes it an even more enjoyable read, adding to the dry, witty humor and dialog in unexpected and fun ways.

Yuck, a Love Story

By Don Gillmor, Marie-Louise Gay (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Yuck, a Love Story as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Winner of the 2000 Governor General's Award for Children's Illustration

Finalist for the CBA Illustrator of the Year Award

Austin Grouper had a brown dog named Fresco, a best friend named Sternberg, and a red bicycle. His life was full. And then a girl named Amy moves in next door. Austin decides that she, like all girls, is yucky. But when the invitation to her birthday party arrives, it seems the only suitable present for Amy is the moon itself, and Austin is prepared to go to the ends of the earth to get it.

Yuck, a Love Story will…


Who am I?

I’m a full-time author and illustrator, and a recovering second grade teacher. I visit with tens of thousands of kids at schools every year and love sharing funny books with them. I’ve written and illustrated over 30 published books and know that kids appreciate subtle humor as well as in-your-face hilarity. I love writing stories that will make readers laugh and think. But mostly laugh.


I wrote...

Almost Everybody Farts

By Marty Kelley,

Book cover of Almost Everybody Farts

What is my book about?

Grandmas fart. Teachers fart. Terrifying creatures fart. But... is there someone who doesn't fart?

With sly humor, this fun picture book looks at a subject that’s sure to make children laugh: farting. With silent farts, farts like horns, and rainbow farts from unicorns, Almost Everybody Farts comically captures the gassy scene. And only one person insists she’s fart-free: Mom! But is she? Kids will insist on reading this rhyming story again and again.

In the Night Kitchen

By Maurice Sendak,

Book cover of In the Night Kitchen

The best book ever of all time, for instructing humans how to be more human is Where the Wild Things Are. I think you probably already know that those pages are complete perfection. So I will now turn your attention to Mr. Sendak’s other completely perfect pages of In the Night Kitchen. Maybe the second-best book ever of all time.

In the Night Kitchen

By Maurice Sendak,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked In the Night Kitchen as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

From the acclaimed author-artist Maurice Sendak comes a Caldecott Honor-winning tale of a fantastical dream world. This comic fantasy will delight readers of all ages with playful illustrations and an imaginative world only Sendak could create.

In the Night Kitchen is the classic story of Mickey's adventures in the bakers’ kitchen as they prepare our morning cake. "Milk in the batter! Milk in the batter! We bake cake and nothing’s the matter!" the bakers sing.

The bakers in the night kitchen need more milk for their batter, but then Mickey falls into the cake! They decide to put him in…


Who am I?

My books may never be a child’s favorite nighty-night story, but I think they offer fresh minds opportunities to visit some unusual places. There are goblins in the forest; so let’s go there together, in delight, holding hands. My poems and illustrations have been featured in numerous books and magazines and honored by the National  Council of Teachers of English and the Society of Illustrators. I live with my youngest son in upstate New York, in a house filled with bikes and balls, color, and music.


I wrote...

A Song

By James Christopher Carroll,

Book cover of A Song

What is my book about?

A girl hears a song and follows its call into the woods where she happens upon a wild band of animals, and receives a wondrous gift that changes her life forever. The story serves as an example to those who have forgotten how to listen to their lives, how to discern music from noise, how to follow the path of mystery and adventure set before them. A Song is an encouragement for readers to listen and to follow their passions in life.

The Big Letdown

By Kimberly Seals Allers,

Book cover of The Big Letdown

Kimberly writes from personal experience and from the heart. She pulls no punches. Her book covers a lot of the obstacles you’d expect – societal attitudes to breastfeeding, the formula industry, and so on – but it’s her chapter on ‘the feminist fallacy’ that really spoke to me. I’ve always been baffled by the lack of support that feminist writers have shown for breastfeeding. They talk about it as a chore, as a restriction on women’s freedom, not as something amazing that a woman’s body can do. Kimberly challenges this thinking head on, fearlessly exposing the flawed thinking that has, in the name of equality, blindly followed an agenda set by men, with the result that motherhood is devalued and breastfeeding is framed as simply an issue of ‘choice’. Her conviction provides me with the hope that we can reverse this. Brilliant.

The Big Letdown

By Kimberly Seals Allers,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked The Big Letdown as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Breastfeeding. The mere mention of it has many mothers wracked with anxiety (how will I manage with work, other kids, what if I don't make enough milk?) or guilt about not doing it (will I be hurting my child ifl choose not to breastfeed? what will people think of me if I choose not to?). This hot-button issue is one we've talked about repeatedly in the media and in celebrity culture. Remember when Angelina Jolie posed for the cover of W nursing her new-born? Oh, the controversy! And when Barbara Walters complained about the woman breastfeeding next to her on…

Who am I?

I got hooked on breastfeeding when, during my health visitor training, our class had a lecture from Drs. Penny and Andrew Stanway, who wrote the original Breast is Best. I breastfed my own children, became a breastfeeding counsellor and lactation consultant (IBCLC), and championed breastfeeding as a health visitor and midwife. I then worked for 14 years with the UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative, teaching and supporting healthcare staff to improve standards of care for breastfeeding mothers and babies. Throughout, I gained a huge respect for babies’ abilities in relation to breastfeeding. This directly influenced my belief in their capacity to continue feeding themselves when they start solid food, which is my current focus.


I wrote...

Baby-Led Weaning: The Essential Guide

By Gill Rapley, Tracey Murkett,

Book cover of Baby-Led Weaning: The Essential Guide

What is my book about?

Solid foods are nowadays recommended from around six months. At this age, the vast majority of babies don’t need to be spoon-fed, and they don’t need their food to be pureed. Instead, they can feed themselves with pieces of real food, using their hands. They know what they need to eat, how fast, and how much. The parent’s role is simply to provide healthy food and shared mealtimes, and to trust their baby’s abilities and instincts.

I first began speaking and writing about BLW back in 2001. A few years later, I teamed up with Tracey Murkett to write the first edition of this book, which sets out the benefits of baby-led weaning, why it makes sense, and how to do it. Since then, baby-led weaning has taken off worldwide and the book – now in its second edition – has been translated into over 20 languages. As a result, many authors have followed in our wake. But our book was, and remains, THE definitive guide.

First Light, First Life

By Paul Fleischman, Julie Paschkis (illustrator),

Book cover of First Light, First Life: A Worldwide Creation Story (Worldwide Stories)

This is a picture book with vibrant illustrations that takes on the topic of creation. It does so, however, not from a scientific perspective but from a mythic one. In a cohesive and fascinating narrative, Fleischman weaves together tales from around the world, identifying each to its source. And yet he emerges with a single story, a story that will capture readers of all ages.

First Light, First Life

By Paul Fleischman, Julie Paschkis (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked First Light, First Life as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

In the beginning there was only darkness...There was fire and ice...There was a single drop of milk. Combining elements of the creation story from different traditions, this narrative weaves together one complete picture of how the world began. It is a celebration of the many and varied peoples of the earth, of their commonalities and their differences. It is a celebration of life.

Who am I?

My expertise on the origins of our universe comes out of fascination, nothing more. I am a long-time children’s writer who began my approach to this topic with awe. Just awe. In order to write The Stuff of Stars I read widely to expand my own understanding. A single line in this text can come out of hours of reading. The books I’m suggesting here, though, are not the scientific ones that informed my telling. Rather, I have searched out books that are exceptionally creative, accessible, interesting. Some are for the very young and some for those who share their learning with the very young.  


I wrote...

The Stuff of Stars

By Marion Dane Bauer, Ekua Holmes (illustrator),

Book cover of The Stuff of Stars

What is my book about?

Before the universe was formed, before time and space existed, there was...nothing. But then...Bang! Stars caught fire and burned so hot that they exploded, flinging stardust everywhere. And the ash of those stars turned into planets. Into our Earth. And into us. In a poetic text, Marion Dane Bauer takes readers from the trillionth of a second when our universe was born to the singularities that became each one of us. Ekua Holmes’ illustrations capture the void before the Big Bang and the ensuing life that burst across galaxies. A seamless blend of science and art, this picture book reveals the composition of our world and beyond — and how we are all the stuff of stars.

Snappsy the Alligator (Did Not Ask to Be in This Book)

By Julie Falatko, Tim J. Miller (illustrator),

Book cover of Snappsy the Alligator (Did Not Ask to Be in This Book)

Another brilliant gem of a book, Snappsy the Alligator is just trying to go about his day, but the annoying narrator of the book insists that he behave in certain ways. This book cleverly considers what the role of character is in a book and how the characters function in their story. Adults will appreciate the sophistication of the concept while younger readers will laugh hysterically at Snappsy’s attempts to be himself despite what the narrator thinks he should do.

Snappsy the Alligator (Did Not Ask to Be in This Book)

By Julie Falatko, Tim J. Miller (illustrator),

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Snappsy the Alligator (Did Not Ask to Be in This Book) as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Is he prowling for defenseless birds and soft, fuzzy bunnies? ls Snappsy a big, mean alligator who's obsessed with snack foods that start with the letter P? It's no wonder Snappsy won't invite the narrator to his party! Snappsy the Alligator (Did Not Ask to Be in This Book) is an irreverent look at storytelling, friendship, and creative differences from a pair of rising stars in the picture book world.

Who am I?

I’m a full-time author and illustrator, and a recovering second grade teacher. I visit with tens of thousands of kids at schools every year and love sharing funny books with them. I’ve written and illustrated over 30 published books and know that kids appreciate subtle humor as well as in-your-face hilarity. I love writing stories that will make readers laugh and think. But mostly laugh.


I wrote...

Almost Everybody Farts

By Marty Kelley,

Book cover of Almost Everybody Farts

What is my book about?

Grandmas fart. Teachers fart. Terrifying creatures fart. But... is there someone who doesn't fart?

With sly humor, this fun picture book looks at a subject that’s sure to make children laugh: farting. With silent farts, farts like horns, and rainbow farts from unicorns, Almost Everybody Farts comically captures the gassy scene. And only one person insists she’s fart-free: Mom! But is she? Kids will insist on reading this rhyming story again and again.

Minnie and Moo

By Denys Cazet,

Book cover of Minnie and Moo: The Case of the Missing Jelly Donut

Minnie and Moo are two cows who go on more adventures than any cows in history. Again, the humor works on multiple levels. Adults will laugh out loud over the cows’ realization that they are made of beef while kids will delight in their ridiculous adventures around the farmyard. Or on the moon. Or in Paris. Or even the hot tub. There are several books in the series and each one is absolutely delightful.

Minnie and Moo

By Denys Cazet,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Minnie and Moo as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

Minnie's jelly donut is gone! Moo is sure it's been stolen. Can the cunning cows stop the crime wave before the donut-napper strikes again?

The funniest and sweetest buddies since Frog and Toad, Minnie and Moo will earn giggles from young readers. The Minnie and Moo stories are fun independent reads and also perfect for reading aloud, as they're filled with funny dialogue from these goofy and adorable cows.

Denys Cazet was an elementary school teacher for 25 years, and has also been a school librarian and elementary school media specialist. He was inspired to tell stories about the silly…


Who am I?

I’m a full-time author and illustrator, and a recovering second grade teacher. I visit with tens of thousands of kids at schools every year and love sharing funny books with them. I’ve written and illustrated over 30 published books and know that kids appreciate subtle humor as well as in-your-face hilarity. I love writing stories that will make readers laugh and think. But mostly laugh.


I wrote...

Almost Everybody Farts

By Marty Kelley,

Book cover of Almost Everybody Farts

What is my book about?

Grandmas fart. Teachers fart. Terrifying creatures fart. But... is there someone who doesn't fart?

With sly humor, this fun picture book looks at a subject that’s sure to make children laugh: farting. With silent farts, farts like horns, and rainbow farts from unicorns, Almost Everybody Farts comically captures the gassy scene. And only one person insists she’s fart-free: Mom! But is she? Kids will insist on reading this rhyming story again and again.

Pancakes, Pancakes!

By Eric Carle,

Book cover of Pancakes, Pancakes!

My toddlers loved Eric Carle's Pancakes, Pancakes! – and enjoyed hearing it over and over. Enticed into the story by Eric Carle's vivid and lively illustrations, you'll follow Jack as he asks his mom for pancakes for breakfast, then goes on an out-sized quest for all the ingredients from all over the farm and countryside. 

Pancakes, Pancakes!

By Eric Carle,

Why should I read it?

1 author picked Pancakes, Pancakes! as one of their favorite books, and they share why you should read it.

What is this book about?

By cutting and grinding the wheat for flour, Jack starts from scratch to help make his breakfast pancake.

Who am I?

When offered a plot at the community garden, I thought it would be fun to invite other families to learn to grow food together. As a science teacher, I knew that for toddlers, digging in the dirt and growing plants for food could plant seeds for a life-long love of exploring nature, hands-on science inquiry, environmental stewardship, and joy in healthy eating. As we gardened, I noticed what questions children and their parents had, and how we found the answers together. I wrote the picture book How to Say Hello to A Worm: A First Guide to Outside to inspire more kids and their parents to get their hands dirty. 

I wrote...

How to Say Hello to a Worm: A First Guide to Outside

By Kari Percival,

Book cover of How to Say Hello to a Worm: A First Guide to Outside

What is my book about?

If you want to learn to garden, where do you start? In this picture book, How to Say Hello to a Worm: A First Guide to Outside, toddlers and preschoolers model joyful first steps. While visiting a community garden, these tiniest teachers share tips such as how to plant peas, how to build a twig trellis, how to know which strawberries are ready to pick and eat, and how to navigate an encounter with a bee. These small scientists observe cause and effect, ask questions, and explore the dirt to find their own answers. Readers will feel empowered to grow food plants and learn from each other as the growing season unfolds to a joyful harvest.

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