12 books directly related to emotional intelligence 📚

All 12 emotional intelligence books as recommended by authors and experts. Updated weekly.

Book cover of The School of Life: An Emotional Education

The School of Life: An Emotional Education

By The School of Life,

Why this book?

Since discovering Religion for Atheists, while researching my first book, I have loved me some Alain de Botton, but I recommend this one because I think it offers the most in terms of practical wisdom across a host of categories. Alain has spent his life doing for others what I spend a lot of time doing for myself: Trying to discover universal truths that lead to a greater enjoyment of life without having to resort to religious dogma or magical thinking. He explains plainly how to love life for what it offers, wholly accept what it does not, and…

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Book cover of Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ

Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ

By Daniel Goleman,

Why this book?

Goleman's book added a new dimension to this by bringing in brain anatomy, especially the function of the amygdala. This is the most primitive part of this organ and it is often referred to as the reptilian brain. Once again it made me aware of the turbulent, reactive part of our emotional setup, acting impulsively and shattering my stability at every turn, in the form of male/female relationships. Like Dabrowski's theory of positive disintegration, it made me look at the world anew.

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Book cover of Search Inside Yourself: The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happines

Search Inside Yourself: The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happines

By Chade-Meng Tan, Daniel Goleman, Jon Kabat-Zinn

Why this book?

Using simple exercises that are perfectly adapted to our pace of life, it teaches us to meditate in mindfulness and to reap all the benefits: relaxation, sharpened concentration, development of creativity and empathy, building healthy and fruitful relationships. This book is an invaluable guide to reach our best potential in our professional and personal lives. And, best of all this author has a great sense of humor.

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Book cover of Working With Emotional Intelligence

Working With Emotional Intelligence

By Daniel Goleman,

Why this book?

Besides motivation, leaders inspire or turn off the people around them. A person’s competencies (behavioral habits with a common unconscious intent) describe and enable a person to lead others effectively, or not. This book is a marvelous integration of the research of others and touching stories to illustrate how emotional intelligence affects our lives and work. Taking a behavioral approach, Dan shows how EI and SI competencies matter. It provides guidance amid an onslaught of dense academic research and pop psych marketing about EI. This is the real thing! It helps explain how there are key competencies (i.e, behavioral habits)…

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Book cover of Wolfsbane (Discarded Heroes Vol. 3)

Wolfsbane (Discarded Heroes Vol. 3)

By Ronie Kendig,

Why this book?

The Discarded Heroes series holds a special place for me, as these books gave me the push I needed to face my fears and finally pursue publishing my writing. The entire Nightshade team was written so authentically, they feel like part of my extended family. I’m recommending book three specifically, because of Canyon and Dani. Their ability to acknowledge their weaknesses, take responsibility for their mistakes, and push through anything to finish their mission still inspires me.

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Book cover of Ruby Finds a Worry

Ruby Finds a Worry

By Tom Percival,

Why this book?

As an expert worrier, I really related to this book about a spunky girl named Ruby who one day discovers a worry. What I love about this book is that the worry is illustrated, so we can see its intimidating facial expression and watch it grow in size. The worry follows Ruby to all her favorite places—the school bus, the swing set, the movies—and it prevents her from doing what she loves. But it’s not until she spots another worry sitting with a boy that she is able to face her fear about the worry and do the best thing…

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Book cover of Constructive Thinking: The Key to Emotional Intelligence

Constructive Thinking: The Key to Emotional Intelligence

By Seymour Epstein,

Why this book?

Ostensibly a book about emotional intelligence, this is in effect an account of Epstein’s theory of the self (see Chapter 3 onwards). I am a strong advocate of ‘dual process’ theories, the idea that we have two minds or modes of thinking, one that is fast, automatic, and reliant on heuristics, and another that is slower, deliberative, and rational. The most famous example of this is in the work of Kahneman and Tversky, who have identified various biases we employ in quick decision making. This understanding is vital for effective critical thinking, but I find Epstein’s notion of an affect-driven…

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Book cover of Sustainable Happy Profit: Products and Organizations that Thrive

Sustainable Happy Profit: Products and Organizations that Thrive

By Ines Garcia,

Why this book?

This book takes an unusual, very modern approach by combining profit with sustainability and happiness. A current controversial discussion, after all, deals with the compatibility of sustainability and profitability. This compatibility is strongly advocated by the author. She also believes that a sustainably profitable offering makes the company and the customers happy. Overall, an enrichment of the discussion about profit orientation!

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Book cover of How to Win Friends and Influence People

How to Win Friends and Influence People

By Dale Carnegie,

Why this book?

This book has been around longer than I have, which makes it borderline ancient. And yet, it is not—and probably never will be—outdated. The advice is so sage, so useful, and so well-written that I still recommend this book to students who want to develop essential communication skills. These skills, when appropriately applied, will make you a more effective persuader and, in my view, a better person too!

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Book cover of Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child

Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child

By John Gottman, Joan Declaire,

Why this book?

Dr. John Gottman is an internationally acclaimed research psychologist whose Emotion Coaching technique has transformed the lives of countless parents and children across the world. This book helps parents understand the big feelings which are often at the root of children’s tantrums and upsets and offers a tried and true, research-based, practical way to respond. Dr. Gottman’s techniques not only help parents respond more confidently and effectively to their children - reducing the length and frequency of tantrums and upsets – but also increase their children’s self-confidence, mental health, and relationship skills. What could be better?!

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Book cover of The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

By Jean-Jacques Rousseau, J. Cohen (translator),

Why this book?

The granddaddy of literary autobiography and biography, Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Confessions was written in 1769 but published posthumously in 1782. Rousseau, whose pioneering Romantic political philosophy was by then already influential, was setting out to do something equally new when he decided to study human nature, taking as his experimental model the human he knew best – himself. The rollicking result, sometimes self-flagellating, occasionally exhibitionist, deviates from its own model, St Augustine’s fourth-century religious-philosophical Confessions, in being chock-full of what nowadays we call emotional intelligence.

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Book cover of Perfectly Norman

Perfectly Norman

By Tom Percival,

Why this book?

My favorite lines in this book are the last few lines. “He realized that there was no such thing as perfectly normal...But he was perfectly Norman. Which was just as it should be.” Norman is a perfectly normal little boy until he grows a pair of wings. Initially, he is afraid to take off his coat and share his new wings with his friends and family. But over the course of the book, Norman realizes that hiding his wings is making him unhappy. When he finally gets the courage to share his true self, he realizes there are lots…

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The best picture books about building self-esteem and self-love